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An Upcoming New Release on Mormonism

Saturday, December 29, 2007

Andrew Jackson is the creator of the FaceBook Group, Christian Blogger Network. He recently sent this review to the members of that group. I do not know any more about Mr. Jackson but we all know about Crossway Publishers and how they exist to publish sound doctrine writings and are also the publishers for the ESV Bible.

‘Scholar and Blogger Dr. Mark D. Roberts, who is the Senior Director and Scholar-in-Residence of Laity Lodge and the author of Can We Trust the Gospels?, has read a pre-release copy of my upcoming book Mormonism Explained: What Latter-Day Saints Teach and Practice (Crossway, 208 pages, March 2008) and has provided the following backcover endorsement for the book:

“For many people today, Mormonism is both intriguing and confusing. It’s hard to figure out what Mormons really believe, especially when they claim to have faith in Jesus as their Savior. Andrew Jackson clears the air with his Mormonism Explained. This book lays out clearly what Mormons believe and why. Chapters on Mormon history are especially enlightening. Jackson also shows how Mormonism diverges from orthodox Christianity in key matters of theology. But his tone is that of a careful teacher who seeks to explain rather than merely to debunk. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to understand Mormonism.”

For updates concerning the release of ‘Mormonism Explained’ sign up for SmartChristian’s Newsletter Emails at the top of the homepage.’

2 Comments leave one →
  1. Thursday, June 25, 2009 12:31 am

    Here is an article on science and Mormonism that I published awhile ago in my blog “Interlingua multilingue”:
    ……………………….

    Science and the Mormons

    The Mormons are a religious sect that emerged from Christianity in the United States in the Nineteenth Century. They added to the Bible their own scripture, the Book of Mormon, translated by Joseph Smith from an original text in a language he called Reformed Egyptian. According to the mythology of the Mormons, in 1827 the angel Moroni gave Smith these texts, which were engraved on golden tables. Smith could understand them without learning their language through the divine magic of two special lenses that he used to read them while he translated them.

    Smith and his followers were persecuted by traditional Christians, who forced them to travel slowly and with great sacrifices until they reached what is now Utah, where their descendants dominate the religious and social life of this American state.

    According to the Mormons, the Indians of the Americas came from Egypt more than 2,000 (two thousand) years ago. They used this myth to convert many Indians to their religion. “We were taught that all the blessings of our Hebrew ancestors made us a special people,” said Jose a Loyaza, a lawyer in Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah. “And this identity gave us a sense of transcendental affiliation, a special identity with God.” But Loyaza gradually learned that there was another outrageous irony to his faith.

    He rejected his religion after learning that evidence provided by comparative DNA studies between American Indians and Asians conclusively proved that the first humans that migrated to the Americas came not from the Middle East but from Asia.

    For the Mormons this genetic confirmation of the origin of the Indians in the Americas is a fundamental collision of science against religion. It is in direct conflict with the Book of Mormon, which, according to their religion, is a completely error-free historical work that must be interpreted literally.

    The Book of Mormon is also fundamentally racist. It narrates that a tribe of Hebrews from Jeruselem went to the Americas in 600 B.C. and split up into two groups, the Nephites and the Lamanites. The Nephites carried the “true” religion to the new world and were in constant conflict with the Lamanites, who practiced idolatry. The Nephites were white (in 1980 the Mormons changed the word to “pure”), and the Lamanites received from God “The curse of blackness.”

    The Book of Mormon also narrates that in 385 A.D. the Lamanites exterminated all the other Hebrews and became the principal ancestors of the American Indians. But the Mormons insist that if the Lamanites returned to the “true” religion (Mormonism, quite naturally), their skin would eventually become white like the skin of the Nephites that their ancestors had exterminated.

    But despite these outrageous racist insults, many Indians and Polynesians (who also, according to the Mormons, are the descendants of the Lamanites) converted to Mormonism instead of telling the Mormons to go fuck themselves. (Through some perverse mechanism in human psychology, these converts are like homosexual priests who support the Roman catholic church or other gay people who support any type of Christianity.)

    “The fiction that I was a Lamanite,” said Damon Kali, a lawyer in Sunnyvale, California, whose ancestors came from Polynesian islands, “was the principal reason that I converted to Mormonism.” He had been a missionary for the Mormans before he discovered that genetic evidence proved that the Lamanites were only a religious myth, and he could not continue his efforts to convert others to Mormonism.

    Officially the Mormon church insists that nothing in the Book of Mormon is incompatible with the genetic evidence. Some Mormons are now saying that the Levites were a small group of Hebrews that went to Central America and after many generations of marrying with the natives they met, their Hebrew DNA disappeared into the DNA of their neighbors.

    In 2002, officers of the church started a trial to excommunicate Thomas W. Murphy, a professor of anthropology at Edmonds Community College in Washington, an American state at the extreme northwest of the continental United States.

    His trial attracted a lot of attention in the American public communications media, which ridiculed the church and insisted that Murphy was the Galileo of Mormonism. The general contempt provoked by this publicity seriously embarrassed the officers of the church, and they stopped the trial.

  2. Thursday, June 25, 2009 12:33 am

    By the way, “Gloria filiorum patres” is not grammatical in Latin. If you mean “Glory to the fathers of the children,” the correct phrase would be “Gloria filiorum patribus.”

    Harleigh Kyson Jr.

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